Tag Archives: paranormal

Review: Nephilim Prophecy (The God Code) by Adrienne Wilder

Nephilim

Title: Nephilim Prophecy (The God Code)

Author: Adrienne Wilder

Genre: Gay/Fantasy & Paranormal

Publisher: Loose ID LLC

Release Date: November 27, 2012

Jade’s Rating: 5 stars

Book Blurb:

Indigo Black is Palet: a human cursed with the ability to see the Demonic, trained to hunt and kill them. Since the peace Covenant was implemented by the Church, Palet have not been allowed to seek out the Demonic. And the one time Indigo challenged the Covenant nearly cost him the life of his lover and guardian angel, Ariel. Indigo was forced to watch Ariel suffer. They broke his wings and cast him out of Heaven, and the burden of that guilt has cost Indigo everything.

But now the rules are changing. The Demonic have broken the Covenant by creating a creature that should not exist: a Nephilim with a human soul who can withstand being possessed by the most dangerous members of the Demonic Parliament.

With the rise in power of the Demonic, Indigo must face the darkest battles of his life: one which will decide the fate of mankind, and another which will decide the fate of his heart.

Publisher’s Note: This book contains explicit sexual situations, graphic language, and material that some readers may find objectionable: male/male sexual practices, violence (including non-consensual sex).

Read an excerpt here (scroll and click on Excerpt tab)

Jade’s Review:

Anyone who is a fan of gay romance and angels and demons will love this story. Indigo and Ariel’s relationship will draw you in and tug on your heartstrings until the very end. They go through so much that you can’t help but hope against hope that they will be able to work things out and hold onto each other. The characters are well written and have such depth, and the pacing between the romance and the greater plot flows well. I couldn’t put The Nephiliim Prophecy down. I read it almost in one sitting, and it left me aching for more…more of Indigo and Ariel, more of Neko, more of their whole world. A spectacular read.

Buy Nephilim Prophecy (The God Code) at Amazon | Loose Id

Find Adrienne Wilder at Facebook | Goodreads | Twitter

*Please note: I purchased this book myself and chose to write a review for it.

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Book Review: In Blue Poppy Fields by Ciaran Dwynvil

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Title: In Blue Poppy Fields

Author: Ciaran Dwynvil

Genre: Gay/Erotic/BDSM/Paranormal/Fantasy

Publisher: Self-Published/Indie

Release Date: March 20, 2013

Jade’s Rating: 5 stars

Book Blurb:

This mesmerizing gay erotic paranormal fantasy belongs to Guardian Demon Series that will hold you prisoner to unforgettable stories of life, love and lust set amid an intriguing fantasy world. Dwynvil’s unique storytelling will captivate you by vivid imagery, narratives told from multiple points of view and explorations of the darker side of D/s theme where safe words aren’t used.

A victim to another man’s cruelty, talented and beautiful theater actor Adhemar Lebeau learned not to trust and not to love anybody but himself. Falsely accused of his master’s murder, he has to accept assistance of mysterious Count Sanyi Arany to later discover his savior is a vampire. Forced both by a fatal illness and aftershocks of torture experienced during his unjust imprisonment, Adhemar agrees to the only possible cure. Rebirth.

Healed in body but not in mind, he guards his independence, free will and heart. He is not able to give love, only the fulfillment of lust. Yet, satiation of sensuous longing is not enough for his Sire and he knows it. When an eerie malady strikes and seems to deplete Sanyi’s life energy for unknown reasons, Adhemar understands his fears and agrees to keep a street boy, Reyach, as a pet for both of them in hope it will soothe the unspoken worries.

Out of necessity he finds himself in the role of the only hunter in their company, and out of attachment he accepts the responsibility readily. Indulgence in blood and carnal pleasures fill his nights and vampiric powers give him the feeling of safety. Until the evening when he carelessly falls prey to High Demon Belial’s plays that quickly turn into more than either of them has bargained for.

In spite of a hard start, Adhemar feels burning urge deep in his heart and no matter how much he denies it, the cause of the strange sensation is a budding seed of affection brought to life by the insufferable demon. But letting Adhemar learn to love somebody other than him is not what seemingly innocent Reyach plans.

Read an excerpt here and here.

Jade’s Review:

Gripping and emotional, sometimes painfully so, In Blue Poppy Fields is yet another masterpiece from the pen of Ciaran Dwynvil. His unique style of storytelling weaves a mesmerizing tale of the lives of his benefactors, as he affectionately refers to them, in their lust for life and love. Having already read the first two books in the Guardian Demon series, Trails of Love I Crawl Parts 1 and 2, I had high expectations for this book, and my expectations were far surpassed.

In Blue Poppy Fields grabs your attention from the very first line when Adhemar Lebeau, beloved diva of the stage adored by all of the audience of Cibinium, finds his master deceased in his bed and the killer long gone. He doesn’t regret the loss as the man had abused him for years but knows that he will be blamed for the crime. And so readers embark on a harrowing journey along with him as he tries desperately first to avoid the blame and then, once the blame has been laid squarely upon his shoulders, to prove his innocence and survive deadly dungeons, ghastly torture methods, and the swift justice of Cibinium. After calling on his savior, the Count Sanyi Arany, the story gets a little more complicated as Adhemar learns he is the Count’s favorite. Tended to by the Count’s man Vincent, who is much more than he seems, but fighting against both Sanyi’s affections and his own illness, Adhemar’s health declines rapidly until drastic measures must be taken in order to save him. Enter the seemingly innocent boy Reyach, a brougham ride to the next city which unexpectedly and inexplicably drains Sanyi of his energy, and later an encounter with High Demon Belial, and Adhemar’s life as the darling of the stage in Cibinium is left far behind him.

Instead he finds himself occupying a different stage, on which he first tests Sanyi’s limits and desires and later finds his own limits pushed to the very edge of breaking by Belial. I’ll note here for potential readers that the book contains elements of BDSM throughout, D/s in particular, so pass on it if that isn’t your cup of tea. I suppose those sections could be skipped over, but you would miss significant moments, leaving gaps in the story. Just as in real life, the sexual and intimate aspect between characters plays a very important role in their lives and interpersonal relationships. The same can be said about the vivid imagery of the torture Adhemar endures while in the dungeon. It is necessary to understand his thought processes and motivations, and it is so well written that I can’t imagine any reader wanting to skip over it.

Just as in the previous books written by Ciaran Dwynvil, the characters in In Blue Poppy Fields will capture readers’ imaginations and steal their hearts. Adhemar longs to be loved and adored by his audience and he deserves every praise and every applause; gentle Sanyi, struggling to accept what he is, just wants for his favorite to return his feelings; their man Vincent who tirelessly takes care of them and somehow knows exactly what each of them needs even when they don’t; Reyach who, because of what he is, can only take and never give anything in return; and Belial…well, we get a taste of his magnificence towards the end of the book and are promised much, much more of it in Part 2.

After the whirlwind ride that had me on the edge of my seat and ended in such euphoria, I was left aching for more. The beautiful writing style, characters that will take hold of your heart and refuse to let go even after the written story ends, catastrophe and triumph, steamy and sensual erotic scenes, heartache, joy…it is all, as the tagline of the series says, a tale of lust for life and love. If that sounds like a story you would enjoy, then In Blue Poppy Fields is the book for you.

Buy In Blue Poppy Fields at: Amazon | Smashwords

Find Ciaran Dwynvil at: his website | his blog | Facebook page | Goodreads | Twitter

*Please note: I loved this book so much that I chose to write a review for it.

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Inspirational Mondays – Show, Don’t Tell

I have decided to start a weekly blog post here on my editing blog called Inspirational Mondays specifically to inspire writers because, after all, editors need writers to keep writing. Otherwise, what would we have to edit? I chose Mondays in particular because it seems we could all use a little inspirational pick-me-up on Monday.

This week’s Inspirational Mondays tip: Show, Don’t Tell!

Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass. – Anton Chekov

Showing your readers the imagery in your mind’s eye is so much more effective and spellbinding than simply telling them. As the above quote by Anton Chekov suggests, rather than saying that your character looked out the window at the full moon, tell how the silver light of the full moon sparkled on the gently rippling surface of the quiet lake. Which do you find more interesting?

I would urge every writer, whether aspiring or published, to give Stephen King’s essay titled “Imagery and the Third Eye” a thoughtful read. Considering how many novels and short stories King has written, and how many film adaptations have been made of them, he seems to know what he’s talking about. Here is what King has to say about imagery: “Imagery does not occur on the writer’s page; it occurs in the reader’s mind.”

So what does he mean by that? He uses an example: “It was a spooky house.” Well, that’s all fine and good, but as a reader, it isn’t enough to tell me that the house is spooky. I want to know what makes it spooky. King then quotes a passage from Salem’s Lot in which he describes features of the house that convey a spooky feeling without resorting to using the word directly. He says:

…that imagery is not achieved by over description… To describe everything is to supply a photograph in words; to indicate the points which seem the most vivid and important to you, the writer, is to allow the reader to flesh out your sketch into a portrait.

When writers set out to describe something for readers, they must use what King calls “the eye of imagination and memory” or the third eye. Readers have their own third eye, so it is the job of the writer to describe the scene so well that readers can see it vividly with their third eye of imagination. That requires a writer to be choosy about what to include and what to omit from the description. If it stands out to you as a writer, then emphasize it in your description. If it isn’t important to the mood and tone of the scene, then leave it out. For example, in the excerpt from Salem’s Lot, King emphasized characteristics about the house that conveyed a spooky feeling,  instead of mentioning anything mundane like a garage or a driveway or how many stories it had. Knowing what to leave in and what to take out is part of what makes a great writer, and it takes a great deal of practice and hard work.

What is the key? According to King, it consists of two things: “First, [pledge] not to insult your reader’s interior vision; and second, [pledge] to see everything before you write it.” In the first case, you don’t need to describe everything. Use the active voice rather than the passive voice, be specific with your descriptors and verbs, choose words that will jump out at readers…and then let the readers’ third eye do the rest. In the second case, King says that oftentimes writers stop looking at the scene before they see all there is to see. Sometimes it may mean slowing down and taking your time, but it will be worth it. Says King: “Writers who describe poorly or not at all see poorly with this [third] eye; others open it, but not all the way.”

The bottom line is this: showing and not telling is important, but just as important is carefully choosing what to show your readers. The very successful Stephen King states that images lead to the story and the story leads to all the other things.

But he also says that the writer’s third eye is “a little bit like having a whole amusement park in your head, where all the rides are free.” And isn’t that the most wonderful thing about writing, being able to send your readers on such rides along with you?

*The essay “Imagery and the Third Eye” was written by Stephen King in 1980. Quotes were taken from the essay published at Wordplayer.com.

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Book Review: Shifting Gears by Petra Lynn

Shifting Gears by Petra Lynn

Title: Shifting Gears

Author: Petra Lynn

Genre: Gay Paranormal Romance

Publisher: Silver Publishing

Release Date: February 2, 2013

Jade’s Rating: 4.5 stars

Book Blurb:

Kenton Palmer finds an injured dog on the road and takes him to the nearest vet only to discover it’s actually a wolf. He decides to nurse the injured animal following the necessary surgery. The handsome vet who treated the wolf offers his own brand of animal attraction, making it clear he’s interested in Kenton.

Gray Fowler is a wolf shifter. Stuck in wolf form after Kenton rescues him, he still falls hard for Kenton. It starts out as jealousy but Gray soon discovers that Kenton’s new love interest, veterinarian Will Barclay, has sinister plans. How are Will’s shady activities linked to the men who injured Gray, and can he expose the scheme before Kenton gets too involved with Will?

Jade’s Review:

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It held my attention so well that I sat down and read it all at once; I kept telling myself that I would stop when I got to the next chapter, and every time I did, I couldn’t stop. I had to find out what happened to Kenton, Will, and Gray.

I am fascinated by the paranormal, and since Gray is a wolf shifter, he quickly became my favorite character. That’s not to say that Kenton and Will were lesser characters. I found the major characters in the book to all be nicely developed, and even the secondary characters had a fair amount of depth. I had a rather difficult time connecting to Will, but I think that is a direct consequence of the book blurb making him seem suspicious before I ever started reading.

Kenton was a wonderfully well-developed character. Readers get lots of background about him that helps to understand his thought processes and motivations. Having had a recent relationship end badly, he understandably wants to takes his time with Will, but he also seems to be a little too trusting and loyal for his own good when it comes to Will. Kenton is a sympathetic and likeable character. After the way he cared about Gray as a wolf, I couldn’t help but to grow fond of him, and I found myself rooting for him and Gray to get together from early in the book.

As a wolf shifter, Gray can shift between full human and full wolf forms. When Kenton finds him injured on the road, he has no idea what Gray really is and just assumes that he is a dog, then takes Will’s word for it when told that Gray is not a dog but a wolf. Gray is forced to stay in wolf form as he heals and grows more and more attached to Kenton while being cared for and staying in his home. The two develop a close relationship that is much more than that of a man and his pet, but still it tortures Gray for wanting there to be more between them. It seems inevitable that a sort of rivalry breaks out between Will and Gray the wolf (or Rain, as Kenton calls him) as they vie for Kenton’s attention. I can’t say more for fear of revealing spoilers, but I found the unusual take on the classic love triangle very interesting to watch and read.

I did encounter one issue while reading “Shifting Gears.” I gave the book a high score, so it didn’t detract from my reading experience very much, but I think it’s worth mentioning. Readers who are looking for a good story with a happy ending may not even notice it. But as a reader and writer with a great deal of interest and experience in the paranormal with regards to fiction, I couldn’t help but notice. Gray is so fixated on Kenton and determined to find out the truth about Will that he hardly gives a passing thought to his pack while in wolf form in Kenton’s care. He tells himself several times that he should go but shuts down that instinct each time to stay a little longer. However, it is later revealed that he is the alpha of his pack, which surprised me a lot, considering. I have a hard time wrapping my head around the fact that any pack wolf, much less the alpha himself, could so easily dismiss his pack and his responsibility to them. Perhaps he had faith that his beta would step up into the role of alpha well while he was away, but I would have liked to see a bit more of a struggle in Gray between responsibility to his pack and his new love interest or, in absence of that, some sort of explanation why the pack wasn’t important then. I also found it a bit disappointing that there were so few details about the shifters’ lives and culture since so much was revealed about Kenton’s life and experiences, but a sequel might be better suited to revealing the details of the wolf shifters.

Overall, I liked this book a lot. It is a strong debut, and I am eager for a sequel. It’s a heartwarming story of two people righting a terrible wrong and overcoming great, if not virtually impossible, odds to find love and happiness. I would recommend “Shifting Gears” to all readers who like strong male characters, and werewolves, in their romance.

Buy Shifting Gears at: Silver Publishing | Amazon.com

Find Petra Lynn at her blog | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads

*Please note: I purchased my copy of this book and chose to write this review.

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Inspirational Mondays – Three Tips for Editing Your Manuscript

I have decided to start a weekly blog post here on my editing blog called Inspirational Mondays specifically to inspire writers because, after all, editors need writers to keep writing. Otherwise, what would we have to edit? I chose Mondays in particular because it seems we could all use a little inspirational pick-me-up on Monday.

This week’s Inspirational Mondays tip: Editing is your friend!

I was working on the proof of one of my poems all the morning, and took out a comma. In the afternoon I put it back again. – Oscar Wilde

*The following editing tips have been copied/paraphrased from JeanNicole Rivers’ blog post 3 Things To Be Aware Of When Editing Your Manuscript and posted here with express written permission from the author.*

Editing is definitely a dear friend of any and every writer, and it should first be the responsibility of the writer to edit his or her own manuscript as thoroughly as possible before letting a professional editor see it. At the same time, a writer is especially close to his or her work and it can be difficult to detect issues that need improvement. So here are a few tips that published author JeanNicole Rivers shared from her own experience editing her manuscript:

  • Be aware of the number of times you use a particular word.

In her post, Rivers shared that she discovered how often she used a particular word only when editing her manuscript. Before then, she had been unaware just how many times that word filled up the pages. I, too, have certain word preferences of which I must be conscious. When I find a word I like, I tend to overuse it and it loses meaning. As a writer, you should be aware of your own preferences and tendencies, even if you must discover them through their frequency in a manuscript. As you are editing, try to replace those overused words with synonyms that best highlight the passage’s meaning.

  • Be careful of the progression of the times of day.

Make sure that days and nights progress naturally in your story. Sometimes this may require you to sit down and just read through your manuscript to see how it sounds as a single unit rather than a series of multiple parts. If your story suddenly jumps from lunch time to midnight without a transition of some sort to explain how it happened, you should work on correcting that mistake through the editing process.

  • Be consistent with spellings of names.

This one seems fairly self-explanatory, but I admit that this has happened to me before. I relied on a MS Word shortcut to insert the name of one of my characters every time I punched a capital K. It was only much later with the assistance of the eagle eye of a reader that I realized MS Word had inserted the name correctly about half of the time and incorrectly the other half. My poor readers were very confused, thinking that I had introduced a new character that none of them had discovered yet. Consistency is important in all writing and editing, but it is especially important when it comes to character/place/item names so as not to confuse your readers.

Hopefully, these tips can help you become a better editor of your own writing so that you can shape it into the best it can be before you present it to anyone else. As Rivers said in her post:

… a collection of mistakes is called experience and experience is the key to success! – JeanNicole Rivers

The bottom line: Take the time to edit and polish your manuscript. These tips can help you edit your work to produce a manuscript in which you can take great pride.

JeanNicole Rivers dabbles in many arts, including theater, acting, singing, and writing. She is the author of Black Water Tales: The Secret Keepers which is the first in a series of thriller novels.

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Just published: Trails of Love I Crawl Part 2 – gay erotic paranormal fantasy

I’m so excited about this! Can’t wait to read it!

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